Hello!  This week for the Indie Game Review I checked out Bravo Storm, by IGV Studios. This is a multiplayer first person shooter in a similar vein as Counter Strike. Bravo Storm is still in beta but is playable and up and running with roughly 25 rooms/games going at a time. The beta has been open since January of 2014 and is still going as they tweak and add features.

Here’s their quick description from the game page:

Bravo Storm is a hardcore first person shooter you can play right in your browser, right here on Facebook.

Impression:

I normally don’t play FPS’s anymore. Most people are faster than me, know more about the controls and maps than I do, and seem to be kinda mean. I’m old and I don’t want to spend my free time frustrated and berated. Grumpy stuff out of the way; I enjoyed FPS’s growing up and I do find the gameplay style fun.  This game is in beta, so people seem to generally be on the same level AND this is a browser based game on Facebook! So instead of constant Sweet Smash™ or invites from similar games, I go do as much or as little damage as I am able and then move on to something else, never to be bothered again.

Bravo Storm provides quick doses of team based FPS combat with fairly little griefing. It’s fun, the maps are varied, and dying doesn’t make you feel like too much of a dope. I enjoyed my time playing it.

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Gameplay Style:

It’s a typical FPS. Crouch, run, jump, switch weapons, and fire. Bravo Storm differentiates itself in two ways. The first is that getting into matches is as simple as scrolling through a list of open maps and joining any ones that have space. Matches are 20 minutes long as well (timed. The second way this is different is that this is a free to play game on Facebook.  Aside from having the Unity 3D plugin installed, you don’t have to do anything else to start playing.

There are occasional server connection issues and I sometimes cannot tell why my bullet didn’t hit the head I was pointing at, but it’s still not bad.

Story:

I didn’t find any story, but you could easily shoe-horn in something about well-armed eastern European countries fighting over some territory…..

Visual style:

This has a contemporary 3D style. The soldiers, weapons, and maps look modern. The assets are all a bit low-rez, but this is still in Beta, and it’s playing through a browser. The game still played smoothly, and that is just as important in a multiplayer pvp browser based game. Right now there are 7 total weapons available, 2 fatigue types, and 4 maps (that I’m aware of). The free to play portion of the game comes in with unlockable weapons and weapon customizations that include cosmetic and functional additions.

Audio:

The game’s audio is good. The gun sounds are distinct enough to tell what other players are firing. The explosions are pretty satisfying, and you can always tell when someone is running around using a knife to stab people (because of the sound effect).

Good:

Fast and easy to get into.

Doesn’t require a separate install….handy for work computers…

No up front cost

Bad.

A little low rez.

Occasional server disconnects (you don’t get credit for a battle then).

 

What is the developer’s background/situation/communication?

What I thought was really cool is a conversation I had with one of the developers. He had told me about the game, seemed ambitious and neat. Then he told me how he was concerned about how to animate female soldiers. It started a whole conversation in the group I was with and I was honestly just happy that the high level of concern this dev had came from wanting to do it right. Not, if, but how. That was a pretty cool consideration.

 

You can also play Bravo Storm for free on FaceBook now!

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Sean Weiland

Sean Weiland

Sean is game designer with a sorted past. Ask him where he's lived and he will give you more than 12 answers. Ask him what he does for a living and he might say "game designer" or he might say "I dance".Ask him about indie games and he will give you a dam honest opinion informed by over a decade of audio, design, and development experience.
Sean Weiland